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THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1946 




THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1946 




<ittrs. jiHabelcmr IBrolmt 



To Mrs. Brown, our constant guide and as' 
sistant through these last years of high school, 
the Senior Class wishes to dedicate the 1946 
edition of the Tattler in appreciation of her 
good sportsmanship shown on our Class trip, 
her good judgment used as our home room 
teacher, and her ability as a leader. 



THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief, Cora Louise Warner 

Assistant Editor, Doris Graves 

Business Manager, Russell Loomis 

Literary Editor, Floyd Merritt 

Assistant Literary Editor, Viola Fraser 

Jokes and Art Editor, Robert Dana 

Alumni Editor, Sue Crone 

Assistant Alumni Editor, Helen Sylvester 

Sports Editor, Marshall Warner 

Exchange Editor, Ruth Bowker 

Faculty Advisor, Mrs. Thornton 



CONTENTS 

Dedication 2 

Senior Class Pictures . . . . ■ . 4 

Honor Orations ....... 8 

Class Will 14 

Class History ....... 15 

Class Grinds 16 

Seniorscope ........ 17 

Song Hits 17 

Class Prophecy ....... 13 

Class of '49 18 

Class of '48 19 

Class of '47 20 

Editorials 21 

Informals ........ 23 

Literary ........ 24 

Tattler Staff 30 

Review Staff 31 

Forensic League ....... 32 

Pro Merito 33 

Basketball 34 

Cheer Leaders ....... 35 

School Orchestra ....... 36 

Alumni Notes 37 

Autographs ........ 38 

Advertisements ....... 39 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




RUTH ELXOR BOWKER 

Glee Club, 1-4; Forensic League, 3-4; School Paper, 3; 
Girls' State, 3; Panel Discussion Mass. State, 4; State 
Debate Tournament, 4; Dramatic Club, 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent, 3-4. 





HATTIE MARION CLARK 

Glee Club, 1-4; Prom Committee, 3; Victory Corps, 2; 
Review, 4; Dramatic Club, 4. 



SUZANNE CRONE 

Pro Merito, 3-4; Glee Club, 1-2-3-4; Treasurer of Class, 
3-4; Review, 3; Secretary of Class, 3-4; Tattler, 4. 




ROBERT PATRICK DANA 

Class President, 4; Baseball, 2-4; Basketball, 3-4; Foren- 
sic League, 3-4; Mass. State Panel Discussion, 4; Tattler, 
3-4; Boys' State, 3; Shrewsbury State Debate, 4. 



THE TATTLER 



RICHARD HERBERT DANIELS 

Orchestra, 2-3-4; Glee Club, 1-2-3-4; Review, 3-4; Basket- 
ball, 3; Baseball, 3; Vice-President, 2. 



ALICE ANN GOLASH 
Glee Club, 4; Prom Committee, 3; Review, 4; Food Sale, 4 



SHIRLEY MAE HATHAWAY 

Historian, 1-2-4; Glee Club, 1-4; Tattler Staff, 3; Prom 
Committee, 3; Victory Corps, 3; Dramatic Club, 4; Pro 
Merito, 3-4; Review Staff, 4. 



ELIZABETH IRENE KULASH 

Victory Corps, 1; Prom Committee, 3; Review Staff, 4; 
Cheer Leader, 4. 




WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




RUSSELL YERDINE LOOMIS 

Student Council, 1; Glee Club, 1-2-3-4; Baseball, 2-4; 
Basketball, 3; Review Staff. 3-4; Tattler. 4. 



HELEN MOORE SYLVESTER 

Glee Club, 1-2-3-4; Victory Corps, 1; Inkspot. 2-3; His- 
torian, 3; Pro Merito, 3-4; D. A. R., 4; Tattler Staff, 4; 
Chairman of Victory Clothing Drive, 4; American Legion 
Oration Contest, 4; Prom Committee, 3; Essay Contest, 4. 



CORA LOUISE WARNER 

Glee Club, 4; Prom Committee 3; Dramatic Club, 4; 
Editor of Tattler, 4; Assistant Editor of Tattler, 3; 
Secretary of Class, 1. 



MARSHALL CLYDE WARNER 

Basketball, 1-2-3-4; Baseball, 1-2-4; Class President, 1; 
Tattler Staff, 4; Glee Club, 1-2-3-4. 



THE TATTLER 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY & TREASURER 
CLASS HISTORIAN 



Robert Dana 

Ruth Bowkei 

Sue Crone 

Shirley Hathaway 



GRADUATION NIGHT 



HISTORY 
PROPHECY 
WILL 
GRINDS 



Cora Warner 

Ruth Bowker 

Elizabeth Kulash 

Robert Dana 



GRADUATION NIGHT ORATIONS 

Development of the U. S. Sue Crone 

The United States Today Helen Sylvester 

The United States in the Future Shirley Hathaway 

CLASS MOTTO— The Door to Success is Labeled Push 

COLORS— Blue and White 

CLASS GIFT— Microscopic Repairs 



SENIOR CLASS 



RUTH BOWKER 
HATTIE CLARK 
*SUE CRONE 
ROBERT DANA 
RICHARD DANIELS 
ALICE GOLASH 



-SHIRLEY HATHAWAY 
ELIZABETH KULASH 
P-USSELL LOOMIS 
* HELEN SYLVESTER 
CORA WARNER 
MARSHALL WARNER 



'Honor 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Honor Orations 



THE DEVELOPMENT 
OF THE UNITED STATES 

Picture to yourself a wide turbulent 
river — in some places not as deep and 
treacherous as others but none the less 
dangerous for its seeming peacefulness. On 
one bank of this river is the United States 
as it was in 1781 just after the Revolu- 
tionary War. What is to become of it no 
one knows. The countries of the world are 
a dissatisfied group. Some are hungry for 
power — others are just plain hungry. On 
the opposite bank is Utopia. Here every 
nation is satisfied and happy with perfect 
laws and perfect unification. To cross the 
river seems simple for there are stepping 
stones within easy proximity all the way. 
but there is one catch — some of the stones 
will not bear up under so great a load. 

In 1793 the United States plunged in and 
placed her foot firmly upon the first stone. 
The name of this stone was Isolationism. 
At first it appeared that it would bear up 
under the strain, but soon the United States 
felt itself slowly sinking. It seemed that 
the neutrality George Washington had 
prescribed was an unattainable drug. 
France wanted help in return for her favor 
during the Revolution. England wanted us 
to keep out of the British West Indies. 
The Mississippi was made forbidden terri- 
tory. Our sailors were being seized, and 
their rights as United States citizens were 
being trampled upon. Still we hung on and 
tried to strengthen our foothold on Isola- 
tionism with the Monroe Doctrine, but in 
the end we saw that it was a losing battle. 
so we stumbled on to the next step named 
Imperialism. 

Small wonder that the distrust and sus- 
picion that we aroused in the world by this 
choice did not end our little expedition, 
small wonder we did not fall in and 
drown with the disfavor we won from the 
countries to the south of us. Spain and 
the Philippines. The other countries of the 
world had watched us expand from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific. They had seen 
us buy Alaska. They had seen how we in- 
terfered with the business of the entire 
Western Hemisphere. They had watched us 



take the Philippines, Hawaii and Cuba, and 
they had begun to wonder. Was the United 
States merely protecting herself from possi- 
ble trouble-makers as she said? True — the 
occupation of any of the countries to the 
south of her by strong foreign nations 
could cause trouble, but then, too, she could 
be doing this expanding by a premeditated 
wide-spread plan for purely selfish reasons. 
The United States lost much of its prestige 
as a generous peaceful democratic nation 
during this period. 

During all of this time the United States 
was changing inside her own boundaries. 
Some inner struggles were preventing her 
from advancing towards Utopia. The Civil 
War temporarily held up our progress. In 
the end, however, the freeing of the slaves 
took us a long way towards reaching a 
perfect democracy. Another turmoil which 
as yet has not been solved and therefore 
still hinders our progress was the agitation 
between the farmers and industry. As the 
manufacturers became richer, the farmers 
became poorer. Certainly this condition will 
never breed peace and unity in our country, 
and until we are united within our own land 
we cannot hope to have a united world. 
Politics became an important question. The 
good of the people was and is no longer the 
main object of our congressmen and other 
governmental officers. More important to 
them became money received, power, and 
their re-election. Often these three inter- 
fered greatly with the legislation passed 
especially just before election time. Our 
government became more and more cor- 
rupt and these conditions will remain until 
the people decide to change them. 

Although internally we were not pro- 
gressing we were making spme headway 
with foreign affairs. We were now firmly 
planted on the step named Co-operation. 
We tried hard to make amends with our 
southern neighbors. Friendly relations with 
all foreign countries became the cry. We 
sponsored good-will programs and confer- 
ences. We invited South America to these 
meetings and formed unions — but it took 
a lot of time and patience to undo the dis- 
favor we had earned under our imperial- 



THE TATTLER 



istic trend. The Czar of Russia planned the 
Hague Conference and invited all of the 
leading powers to attend. This helped a 
great deal in straightening out many of 
the quarrels in the world and it helped our 
unity idea, but it could have turned out a 
lot better than it did if the United States 
had given her whole-hearted support. 
It seems strange that we did not, for 
we claimed to be the most peace-loving 
nation in the world, yet we just could not 
seem to be able to hand over our support to 
help these peace measures. It was simply 
that we were too jealous of our power — too 
afraid that we might lose some of it. 

You may be thinking by now that the 
United States was the only one crossing 
this river. Well, she wasn't. All the coun- 
tries of the world were struggling over, but 
one of the more noticeable was Germany. 
Of course, the Germans' idea of Utopia 
was far different from ours. Their idea of 
a perfect world was to have everyone sub- 
ject to their will. Throughout their history 
were three prominent repetitive periods. 
First a mammoth growth of power, a war, 
and then humble submission. Yes, after 
each war Germany has lost, she has prom- 
ised to behave. But has she? No, and she 
never will until we learn not to believe her, 
or maybe it's just that we want to believe 
her. We must keep her in hand instead of 
letting her do as she wishes. Not until we 
all unite for a common good can we hope 
to quench Germany and all other countries 
like her. Each time that the nations of the 
world have tried to join together for pro- 
tection against such a war as we have just 
experienced, we have refused to give our 
complete support. Before the first World 
War the United States refused to back 
up the Hague Conference and after 
the war she would not join the League of 
Nations. Even today she will not be as an 
equal to all other nations in the United 
Nations Organization for she, Great 
Britain, Russia, China and France have the 
power to veto anything they don't want 
passed in the Security Council regardless 
of the wishes of the smaller nations. 

We have two major steps left to reach 
Utopia. Two that must be found before we 
shall attain our goal. The first is unity and 
equality within our own boundaries. The 



other is good-will and peace among all of 
the nations of the world. We have come a 
long way — some even believe that we are, 
or practically are, climbing up the further 
bank — but really we still have a long hard 
struggle in front of us. We must erase 
racial and religious prejudice, hunger and 
want from the entire world — firs tat home 
here in the United States and then find 
some way of helping the rest of the nations 
to do the same. Ihis means putting our 
ideas across to people who have no com- 
prehension of the words democracy, peace 
and freedom. This will prove to be a hard 
and tedious task unless it has the full sup- 
port of everyone in our country. We are 
lucky, for we are nearer to Utopia than any 
other country, but we will never reach there 
alone. We must have every country in the 
world with us before we can obtain a last- 
ing peace. 



THE UNITED STATES TODAY 
The story that you have just heard of 
the history and development of the United 
States should make every American breast 
swell with pride. But as we look at our na- 
tion today and realize the great turmoil it 
is in, are we still proud? Do we still have 
this feeling of pride toward a nation whose 
people are constantly fighting between 
themselves? During my talk I want you to 
think about this question. The future of 
this nation depends on its people — and you 
and I are its people. 

The United States is one of the largest 
nations in the world, in population, area, 
and wealth. Its people speak one language 
and enjoy the privilege of self-government. 
We govern ourselves by means of a com- 
plicated machinery unlike that of any other 
nation. Right now with President Truman 
in office, people blame everything possible 
on him. Even if he had done everything 
right he would still be in trouble because 
of a world of woe that he inherited. If we 
stop to think for a while, the condition of 
our country is no more his trouble than 
our very own — yet still we accuse him of 
being the cause of the various strikes 
throughout the nation. 

Let us consider the strikes for a moment- 
There are hundreds of industries, large and 
small, each strategic in its own way, where 



10 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



strikes are still a possibility. What do we 
do about them ? Civilian Production Admin- 
istrator John D. Small made a suggestion 
a couple of months ago that everyone com- 
pletely overlooked. He proposed a six- 
months moratorium on all strikes. Maybe 
it wasn't as insignificant as it seemed at 
the time. How could we get a general 
moratorium on all strikes? No strike can 
be truly settled by law or presidential de- 
cree, so it must be the people themselves 
who must look for and eventually find the 
solution. Labor leaders, employers and 
workers who strike should stop and con- 
sider for a moment just how much good it 
is doing their nation and themselves (if 
any)! Professor Sumner Slichter of Har- 
vard in the current "Atlantic Monthly" 
points out that "not until 1948 will General 
Motors workers be as well off as they would 
have been had they not struck and had 
they wordked steadily without any wage 
increase whatsoever." The same thing, with 
different time factors, applies to all the big 
strikes of this year. 

Are you proud of the nation that you 
are pushing into corruption ? Better still — 
are you proud of yourself? — an American 
who is standing by watching on the side- 
lines and doing nothing but talk and com- 
plain about the way his country is run? 

A couple of months ago, the "Big Four" — 
Russia, Great Britain, France, and the 
United States met in Moscow to draw up 
peace treaties for the smaller defeated na- 
tions of Europe. Nothing was definitely de- 
cided at this meeting except the date and 
time for the next meeting. The United 
States is also one of the Big Five in the 
United Nations. This definitely proves that 
she can no longer pretend or even try to 
keep the policy of isolatioonism that she 
has had for so many years. The American 
people at the end of World War II thought 
that since they had given so many dollars 
and lives they would now automatically 
have peace. The atomic bomb has changed 
the minds of a few, but the majority still 
believe that we have at last conquered all 
our enemies. Does the end of the war make 
you feel that now your nation can live 
independently and let the rest of the world 
go its way? I certainly hope not because 
if that were your feeling how soon we 



would be thrust into another and more dis- 
astrous war. 

There is a popular song with the title, 
"I Know a Little Bit About a Lot of Things, 
But I Don't Know Enough About You." 
That could very easily be used to symbolize 
the relationship of an American with his 
country. How little we actually do know 
about our country. True, most of us read 
the papers and listen to the radio, but the 
real activities of our government are us- 
ually quite unclear. Since we ourselves 
govern the country we live in, shouldn't it 
be our duty to see that everything possible 
is done to stop our nation from entering 
another war? 

If Germany ever makes the atomic bomb, 
her flyers can carry it a few hundred miles 
away no matter how many friendly gov- 
ernments we have dominated in Europe and 
no matter how many promises of help the 
United States will have made. There is no 
further security against invasions so long 
as the stratosphere is a possible means of 
approach. 

There is only one kind of security that 
will aid all people. It can only be achieved 
by an abandonment of materialism and 
selfishness in public policy. It requires the 
doctrine that spiritual brotherhood super- 
cedes all else. The only safety for the world 
in this atomic age lies in the hearts and 
minds of God-fearing men and women who 
have learned to surrender to His will and 
to rely on the security that comes from a 
free conscience and an unselfish devotion to 
the simple principles of Christian ethics. 
Governments can write treaties and pledge 
security but only free people with honest 
leaders can assure peace. 

The future of the United States depends 
on its people and until they can decide for 
themselves whether or not to engage in 
organized murder, there can be no security 
in the world. 

If the United States today could develop 
a world of peace and security, which I, 
myself, have never experienced, the love 
and homage we all have for the Land of 
the Free and the Home of the Brave would 
and could be increased. 

HELEN SYLVESTER '46. 



THE TATTLER 



11 



WHAT'S AHEAD FOR US 
I am a citizen of the United States of 
America. As long as I continue to live here 
I will retain my citizenship — a citizenship 
which gives me such rights as "freedom of 
speech," "freedom from fear," "freedom of 
religion," "of the press"; the same rights 
as were laid down in the Declaration of 
Independence — those being life, liberty, and 
the pursuit of happiness. With these same 
rights, old though they may be, I, and all 
the graduates here tonight, and those over 
all the country, are determined to form a 
more compact America — ideal in every re- 
spect. 

It is the belief of many that there is no 
use preparing for the future. With the 
atomic bomb developed during World War 
II, here will be no future — especially if this 
object of devastation should get into the 
hands of our enemies. Throughout the world 
today flows the feeling of suspicion which 
will, in the end, cause so much envy and 
hatred that without the slightest doubt 
there will be another war leading to the 
utter depopulation of all the peoples on 
earth. It is our greatest and utmost ambi- 
tion to rid the world of this distrustful- 
ness — and the United States is a good place 
to start. 

We call ourselves a democracy — taking 
pride in being the greatest, most peaceful 
democracy ever known — asking others to 
find a pattern in our success. But are we ? 
Days upon end we read of strikes for higher 
wages, shorter working hours or some 
unfairness that seems to be the employer's 
fault — not the employee's. One of our great 
problems is to find homes for the returned 
veterans and ample jobs for them all. Situ- 
ations like these are not always to be 
blamed upon the government, as a govern- 
ment, but on the people individually. 

What makes a good, healthy government ? 

The answer is people — people of sturdy 
mind with enough intelligence and common 
sense to carry out their allotted duties. 
Today as always we have altogether too 
much fraud in politics — people who are in 
office for the sole purpose of making money 
by illegally drawing it from the state or 
national treasury or by overtaxing the 
common people. One step for a better gov- 



ernment is to remove this type of person 
from office and put in an honest one. Of 
course it is not for me to say who has the 
brains and who has not! Neither is it up 
to me to pick out one person and put 
him in office. 

There is no doubt in my mind that for 
years to come the United States will stand 
as she does now — four distinct sections. 
There will always be a New England — the 
conservatives they call us — steadfast in our 
beliefs — strict in our way of life — devout, 
hard-working people whose ambition it is 
to farm the land that had belonged to our 
forefathers. We are the proud owners of 
one of the prettiest sections in America 
and we have become renowned for our old- 
fashioned square dances, our Boston Baked 
Beans and Brown Bread. We are the center 
of all American history with our antique 
houses, forgotten old graveyards, but, too, 
we are the base that our country was 
founded upon. 

Then we turn to the South; the radicals — 
the demure little Southerners whose love 
for luxury and society has made them 
famous. Here we see the rolling cotton 
fields with hundreds of Negroes swaying 
to the tune of a spiritual — steamboats rock- 
ing up the Mississippi — gracious old man- 
sions where years before the halls had 
resounded to the sweet minuets. 

We come to the West — the pioneers, 
free-and-easy people — loving the out-of- 
doors. Here we think of the cowboys with 
their acres of good ranch land, herds of 
cattle, singing and lariat-swinging. 

The Great Lakes region from whence 
cometh our supplies of grain, harbors an- 
other set of people. They are not heard of 
so frequently but their love for our country 
is just as great. 

These are the people who make up the 
United States of America — these and others 
— the Kentucky mountaineers, the giant 
lumbermen of the Maine backwoods, the 
Lake Superior region; the Indians, the men 
from Brooklyn, people of the Ozarks, com- 
monly called hillbillies — the Rocky Moun- 
taineers — the Mormons of Salt Lake City- 
all of them. Without them there would be 
no United States — no land of plenty — no 
land of famous men and women whose in- 



12 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



ventions have startled the world; whose 
demand for the "Rights of Man" has made 
them one of the most intellectually great 
nations of the world. 

Someone once wrote: God made America 
the melting pot of the world. He took the 
Pole, the German, the Scotchman, the Ne- 
gro, Chinaman, Indian, the Spaniard, Eng- 
lishman, the Italian and out came the 
American. 

We ought to be proud of our heritage, 
but we certainly don't show it. What is 
the matter with us? Are we like the 
Romans in another respect, too; in that we 
are too over-sure of ourselves and are hav- 
ing a good time when we should be work- 
ing? Are we riding for a fall? 

We have the makings of a fine nation, 
but the mold is too soft! Instead of being 
the diligent, hard-working kind, humble 
but proud people that our ancestors were, 
we have sunk to the state of bickering, 
arrogant, complaining people who find it 
hard to get along in our own homes — 
much less with our neighbors. We have 
reached the point where we think there no 
longer is need for union. Industry goes off 
on its own — disregarding completely the 
wishes and critical remarks of the rest of 
the country. 

Do you honestly believe we deserve the 
praises that we bestow upon ourselves es- 
pecially when such defects as "racial preju- 
dices," "race riots," "strikes," "black mar- 
ket," "juvenile delinquency" and "crime 
waves" stand out so boldly for all to see. 

What's ahead for us? To tell you frankly 
— to me the future looks pretty dark. Some 
nation must lead the world toward peace, 
but how can it be us? In a recent edition 
of the "Reader's Digest" Joseph Kennedy 
says that peace is visualized as the end 



product of progress. Are we progressing or 
receding? 

Out of the dimness of our very existence 
there is one strong governing hand for which 
we may grasp and to which we may cling. 
Every day it is taught from the pulpit with 
such forcible sayings as "Love thy neigh- 
bor as thyself"— "I am the Way, the Truth, 
and the Life" — "Do unto others as you 
would have others do unto you" — the teach- 
ings of the brotherhood of man. Here is our 
great chance for a successful future, and we 
calmly shun it — taking upon ourselves the 
more petty duties of trying to form a world 
government which has no foundation. Be- 
fore we have a firm United Nations, we 
must build up an understanding between 
nations that will remove the causes of war; 
we must make a union between capital and 
labor; governments that are imperial must 
learn to treat their colonies rightly with 
prejudice banished forever. The only way 
this can be accomplished is through univer- 
salism. It may be a foolhardy idea but it 
can be done. But I say, as long as men go 
on pushing aside their very purpose in life, 
that being to live in love and service, the 
whole world will explode in its own evil 
designs. 

Our only hope for development in the 
future lies solely in the people of today. 
It depends entirely upon us whether we take 
the lead in a peaceful world or are subject 
to invasion by belligerent nations. 

Our nation will be what we make it — it 
will either be one of happiness and con- 
tentment, love and peace — or it may be the 
direct opposite. 

For everybody's sake, let's make it good, 
so that some day we can sincerely say — 
one nation, indivisible, with liberty and 
justice for all. 

SHIRLEY HATHAWAY '46. 



THE TATTLER 



13 



Class Prophecy 



I was working in Geneva as a sociologist 
for the Department of Agriculture. The 
department appointed me, being an expert 
in this line, to take a census on the number 
of people who eat potatoes three times a 
day. 

Hopping on my uranium-powered pogo 
stick I started on my tour of the world. My 
first stop was in the land of rubies and 
emeralds, India! Parking my pogo stick, I, 
anxious for India's friccasied strawberries, 
went into a dimly lit restaurant. I was 
told by the waiter that no seats were avail- 
able since a woman by the name of Alice 
Golash was holding an annual banquet for 
the employees of the Mub-a-mi India Ink 
Export Firm. I thought for a moment the 
name sounded familiar. I asked the waiter 
if it was the Alice Golash who came from 
the United States .When he said "Yes," I 
waited for the moment to be able to speak 
to an old classmate. 

In came Alice with her many servants 
following behind. I thought that her wealth 
might have made her proud, but she was 
the same as ever. "Why, Ruthy, how are 
you?" — and so we talked for hours. I found 
that Betty Kulash had taken a position as 
a beautician in one of the chain stores 
owned by none other than Cora Warner who 
was married to a successful British busi- 
ness man. 

After touring the rest of Asia I returned 
to Geneva with my reports to await fur- 
ther assignments. Looking through my per- 
sonal mail I found a letter from Sue, whom 
I hadn't seen for about twenty years, in- 
viting me to spend some time with her the 
next time I was in the United States. Being 
head physician at the Mayo Clinic in Chi- 
cago, Sue was now the tenth richest woman 
in the United States. Sounded like the old 
Sue. 

I received my orders to go to California 
to continue my research work. Going 
through Southern Germany on my way to 
Bi - emen I saw a huge billboard in a field. 
I pulled my pogo stick to a stop. With 
astonishment I read that Marshall Warner 
and his Jovial Joshers were playing at a 
square dance in the local town hall. Mar- 



shall was the prompter. I wanted very 
much to hear a New England accent at a 
Bavarian folk dance, but being a busy 
woman, I found that it would take too 
much of my time, so I jumped regretfully 
on my pogo stick and pranced away to Bre- 
men. From there I boarded a compressed 
air operated helicopter that would take me 
to England. When we were miles above 
the channel, I became air-sick; consequently 
I rang for the stewardess. When she walked 
up to me and said, "May I be of assist- 
ance," I was amazed to see Hattie Clark. 

"Why, Hattie, the talks in aeronautics 
class weren't so far-fetched after all!" 

"I'll say not. Guess who is your pilot!" 
I soon found out that my life was in the 
hands of my old debating pal, Bob Dana. 
Bob came into the passenger compartment 
and we talked over old times about as exu- 
berantly as we used to at Packard's. 

When we landed in London I took the 
royal suite at the Sheridan. After a lus- 
cious meal I strolled down Trafalgar 
Square where much to my pleasure I saw 
Shirley Hathaway, now a teacher at Wil- 
liamsburg High, who was escorting the 
Class of 1960 on a world tour. London was 
their last stop, and I was overjoyed to find 
that Shirley and her erudite scholars would 
accompany me on the boat trip home. After 
a week's stay in London I packed my pogo 
stick in my suitcase and we rode to South- 
ampton where we took the liner S.S. Ruby. 

That night the class, being utterly ex- 
hausted, found the need for a good night's 
sleep. After they were in bed, Shirley and I 
went into the salon where a ship's party 
was being held. We were startled if not 
surprised to see Dick Daniels, who was the 
captain of the boat. He told us that sea 
duty kept him out of the troubles one so 
often encounters on land, therefore he 
planned to stay with this work for some 
time to come. Again I had the pleasure of 
talking for hours with old school chums. 

Docking at New York I said good-bye to 
Shirley and stayed at the Ritz Carlton. 
One day while I was in Bonwit Teller's 
sports department I was literally mowed 
down by Helen Sylvester who was trying out 



14 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



her new roller skates that she needed at 
the City Hospital where she was employed 
as head nurse. She needed the skates to 
enable her to see a'l of her patients with- 
out walking the endless corridors. Helen 
joined me for lunch at S:hrafft's where we 
talked for several hours. She had the week- 
end free, so we both went to LaGuardia 
where we took the plane to Chicago to see 
Sue. In the plane I learned that Russy was 
also at Chicago. This was no surprise to me 
since Sue was there, too. When we landed 
in Chicago we took a cab to Sue's sumptu- 



ous mansion in the suburbs. 

The door was opened by the butler who 
escorted us into the kitchen where Russy. 
believe it or not. was preparing a succu- 
lent meal. After spending several enjoyable 
days with them I unpacked my pogo stick 
and gaily popped off for California, there 
to continue my important work. 

I would never have believed that I would 
be able to see again all of my classmates 
who had risen to fame and happiness. 

RUTH BOWKER '46. 



Class Will 



CLASS WILL 



The Class of 1946 takes great pleasure 
in presenting to you tonight, our last will 
and testament. We are about to leave Wil- 
liamsburg High School, but before leaving 
we should like to bequeath our treasures 
and most precious possessions. 

To the faculty as a whole we leave our 
sincere thanks for having tried to teach us 
in the past four years. 

To Mr. Merritt we would like to leave a 
pair of iron-soled shoes that he is to wear 
when coming in to visit classes. With the 
shoes he wears now we cannot hear him 
until he has entered the room. 

To Miss Dunphy we leave a special office 
girl to lecture students who skip school. We 
have noticed this past year that quite a few 
students made frequent trips to the office. 

To Mr. Foster we leave a 1946 car so he 
can go farther than Northampton without 
having to worry about his car breaking 
down. 

To Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Thornton who 
are leaving this year, we wish to express 
our sincere thanks for having tried to teach 
us in the past two years. 

To Miss Webber we leave a personal 
secretary. We heard Miss Webber is having 
a little difficulty in keeping up her good 
work. 

Russell Loomis leaves his frequent trips 
to South Street to anyone who thinks he 
can make them as often as Russell has. 

Sue Crone, Helen Sylvester and Ruth 
Bowker leave their seats in Speech and 



English IV to anyone who can enjoy them 
as much as they have. 

Dick Daniels wishes to leave his horn to 
anyone who can blow it better than he 
has in the past years. 

Bob Dana and Marshall Warner wish to 
leave their places in the Lab to Frank 
Collins and Freddie Oliver. They hope that 
Frank and Freddie won't take this oppor- 
tunity to blow up the school. 

Hattie Clark leaves her place at the 
Ashfield dance every Saturday night to 
anyone who can get that far up in the 
country. 

Shirley Hathaway wishes to leave her 
high honors to Honey Harlow. Shirley 
hopes that Honey will take good advantage 
of these honors. 

Cora Warner leaves her quiet ways to 
Viola Fraser and Frieda Hurteau. Cora 
thinks Viola and Frieda are a little bit too 
noisy. 

Alice Golash leaves her seat in Room I 
to Janet Hillenbrand. We hope that Janet 
will use it more often than Alice has. 

In testimony, therefore, we hereunto set 
our hands and seal in the presence of these 
witnesses and declare this to be our last 
will and testament this twentieth day of 
June, in the year one thousand nine hundred 
and forty-six. 

Witnesses: 
Bing Crosby 
Andy Russell 
Frank Sinatra 
BETTY K CLASH "46. 



THE TATTLER 



15 



Class History 



Everyone is interest in history and for 
this reason I would like to give you a brief 
resume of the history of the Class of '46. 

In the year 1942 thirty-six Freshmen 
struggled up the stairs and into Room VI. 
This was to be our home room for the com- 
ing year with Miss Merritt as our home- 
room teacher. For the first few days we 
became acquainted with our new classmates 
and the faculty who were as follows: Miss 
Dunphy, Miss Webber, Mr. Foster, Miss 
Merritt, Miss Barrus, Miss Lawe. 

Many of us had our doubts of what was 
to come, but we soon settled down to a 
normal routine. Just as we seemed to be 
getting along fairly well someone men- 
tioned Freshmen Reception. Our hearts 
sank. What was going to happen ? It 
seemed as if the fatal night would never 
come. At last it did and we all survived 
with only our dignity a bit ruffled. 

We elected as class officers the following: 
President, Marshall Warner; vice-president, 
Clifton Smart; secretary, Cora Warner; 
treasurer, Theodore Harlow; historian, 
Shirley Hathaway. 

We were all very new at this stage of 
the game and consequently were kept very 
busy with our studies and class offices. Be- 
fore we knew it it was summer vacation and 
we had completed our first year of high 
school. 

The following September found a more 
settled class entering school. The faculty 
remained the same with the exception of 
Miss Barrus who was replaced by Miss 
Johnson, and Miss Lawe who was replaced 
by Miss McDermott. 

Again we elected class officers with Mor- 
ris Healy as president, Richard Daniels as 
vice-president and treasurer, and Robert 
Lesure as secretary; Shh'ley Hathaway was 
again historian. 

During this year we started our cam- 
paign to earn money, but we didn't really 
accomplish very much. In the latter part 
of the year Miss Johnson left us to take 
an editorial position in Washington; Mrs. 
Lula Smith took her place. Time flew by 
and very soon June rolled around again. An- 
other year had slipped by. 



When we entered school in September, 
1944, our class had diminished to 15. Our 
home room was the sunny little room No. 
II with Miss Webber as home-room teacher. 
The faculty had again changed. Miss Mc- 
Dermott had appeared with a diamond 
third finger left hand and Miss Merritt had 
joined the "WAVES." Mrs. Brown became 
the new commercial teacher and Mrs. 
Thornton the new English teacher. Again 
we elected a whole new staff of officers: Ed- 
ward Lezynski, president; Ruth Bowker, 
vice-president; Sue Crone, secretary and 
treasurer; Helen Sylvester, historian. 

We all were kept busy trying to earn 
money. In May we put on a Junior-Senior 
Prom and came out on top. One of the main 
events of the evening was electing a queen. 
As the result Phyllis Rhoades became 
queen. 

The year soon slipped by and before we 
knew it we were Seniors. This had been our 
goal. How proud we were to have reached 
it. We elected Edward Lezynski president; 
Morris Healy vice- president; Sue Crone, 
secretary and treasurer; Shirley Hatha- 
way, historian. 

During our last year we were all very 
busy and full of ideas on how to earn 
money. If we earned enough we could go 
on a class trip. Finally by putting on card 
parties and food sales we acquired the 
needed amount. We would have liked to 
have Edward Lezynski and Morris Healy go 
along with us, but they went into the Navy. 
After they left we elected Robert Dana as 
president and Ruth Bowker as vice-pres. 

On February 25 we started to New York 
under the guidance of Mrs. Brown and 
Rev. John Webster. We took in some of the 
famous sites as: The Empire State Build- 
ing, the Statue of Liberty, and many others. 
We returned home on the 28th a tired but 
very happy group. 

No matter how hard you try you can't 
stop time. Even before we realized it school 
was ended. We all realize what a good time 
we have had. I know some day each and 
every one of us will look back on history 
and recall these happy times. 

CORA WARNER '43. 



16 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Class Grinds 



I really don't know where to start. 

To be able to write is really an art, 
But I may as well go 

Through the people you know. 
And explain them all in short. 

We started out four years ago, 
In number thirty-two or three, 

But through the years we've dwindled low 
And are only thirteen, as you see. 

There is Russy Loomis, 

The curly haired boy. 
He was the senior class's 

Pride and joy. 

Among the girls 

With whom we had fun 
Was Ruthie Bowker, 

Second to none. 

Dick Daniels, too, 

Is a hard-working guy. 
He worked hard at his studies. 

As a dancer rated high. 

Shirley Hathaway 

Is very quiet, 
But her calm wit 

Has often caused a riot. 

Marshall Warner and Bob Dana 

Are the last of the boys, 
And our contribution 

Is to the Navy's joys. 

And sweet Sue Crone, 

Whom we think so shy, 
Used just that element 

To catch "Russy's" eye. 



Betty Kulash is 

Our beautiful "Goldilocks." 
We expect a call any moment 

From 20th Century Fox. 

Among the elite 

You will find very neat, 
And really "all reet." 

Helen Sylvester. 

Then we have a girl 

With a long golden curl. 
A better choice you couldn't send, 

Than Cora Warner for a friend. 

Alice Golash is a quiet lass 

Known to all as "Baby." 
She should really go places, 

And I don't mean maybe. 

Hattie Clark is a good student; 

She doesn't annoy the teachers, 
But when she cracks a corny joke, 

You land out in the bleachers. 

We are leaving dear old Burgy now 

For a world of opportunity. 
Medicine, politics and law will separate 
our unity, 

But we won't forget. 

Or ever regret 
When our chance comes to do or die. 

Four years together at Burgy High. 

BOB DANA '46. 



THE TATTLER 



17 



Seniorscope 



NAME 



AMBITION 



PET LIKE 



PET DISLIKE WEAKNESS 



Helen Sylvester Nurse 
Robert Dana U. S. Navy 

Cora Warner Success 



Shirley Hathaway Success and 
Happiness 



Sue Crone 



Ruth Bowker 



Doctor 



Sociologist 



Marshall Warner Farming 

Alice Golash Success 

Russell Loomis Live happily 

Hattie Clark Secretary 

Richard Daniels Success 



Math 


Short men 


Biting finger nails 


Fcotball 


Latin 


Girls 


Working with 


Long boring 


Food 


material things 


themes 




Writing 


Public 
Speaking 


Eating 


Navy 


Public 
Speaking 


32 Ford 


People with 


Short Men 


Temper 


personality 






Dances 


Studies 


Eating 


Horseback 


Poor Sports 


Eating 


riding 






South Street 


"Verdy" 


Ice Cream 


Eating 


Crunching 
potato chips 


Roger 



Dancing 



History 



Girls 



Song Hits 



Sue Crone "From One Love to Another" 
Marshall Warner "Dorothy" 

Helen Sylvester, 

"Full Moon and Empty Arms" 
Russell Loomis, "My Dreams Are Getting 

Better All the Time" 
Miss Webber "Patience and Fortitude" 

Ruth Bowker "I'm Not Having Any" 

Physic Class "It's Got to be This or That" 

Barbara Outhuse "Oh Johnny" 

Frank Collins, 

"Just a Square in the Social Circle" 



Mr. Foster "Give Me the Simple Life" 

Barbara Dymerski 

"If I Had a Dozen Hearts" 
Monday Mornings "Blue" 

Bob Dana "Bragging" 

E. Lezynski and M. Healy, 

"Home Sweet Home" 
Jr. Demerski, "You Won't Be Satisfied Until 
You Break My Heart" 
Floyd Merritt and Viola Fraser, 

"True Love" 
Dick Daniels "Oh What It Seemed to Be" 
Bette Kulash "Blonde Sailor" 



18 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Class of 1949 




Fiist Row: Lily Mathers, Phyllis Cram, Mary Dodge, Lorraine Richardson, Irene 
Swinington, Theresa LaCourse, Esther Loomis, Arlene Sears, Jeannette Balawin. 

Second Row: Raymond Derouin, Eva LaFleur, Nancy Dunphy, Frieda Hurteau, 
Dorothy Golash. 

Third Row: Warren McAvoy, Raymond Morin, Irene Ferron, Doris Shumway, Ann 
LeDuc, Ruth Merritt, Leo LaCasse, Dorrance Bates, Frank Vaillancourt. 

Fourth Row: Allen Sylvester, Edward McColgan, Ronald Beattie, Roy Baldwin, 
Justin Barnas, Henry Bisbee. 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT, Warren McAvoy TREASURER, Edward McColgan 

VICE PRESIDENT, Theresa LaCourse SECRETARY, Esther Loomis 

HISTORIAN, Irene Ferron 



THE TATTLER 



19 




CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT, Viola Fraser TREASURER, Robert Collins 

VICE PRESIDENT, Laura Lloyd SECRETARY, Virginia Dodge 

HISTORIAN, Shirley Shumway 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT, Barbara Dymerski 
VICE PRESIDENT, Betty Brooks 



SECRETARY-TREASURER, Shirley Payne 
HISTORIAN. Dorothy Carver 



THE TATTLER 



21 



Editorials 



"THE DOOR TO SUCCESS IS 
LABELED PUSH" 

What is this "DOOR TO SUCCESS"? 

It is not a rectangular piece of wood at- 
tached to the wall by a pair of hinges, 
which swings open and shut; it is a period 
in our life when we are trying to obtain 
something, and by getting this desire we 
have passed through an imaginary door. 

By doing this we are a success within 
ourselves as well as a success to others. 
This DOOR is always ready to be opened 
by someone. For some it will open easily, 
but for others there will be obstacles to 
cross their paths and hinder them from 
even grasping the handle. But if the person 
who is struggling has the ambition and 
ability to cope with these difficulties, the 
DOOR will soon be open to them. This is 
what is meant by "THE DOOR TO SUC- 
CESS IS LABELED PUSH." All things 
that we want must be worked for. The 
harder the work the better the results. 
This does not mean that to be a success one 



must become famous or world-known. 

To be satisfied within yourself is a suffi- 
cient reward. Many of us will perhaps stay 
in our own small towns all of our lives. 
If we should become town officers and help 
run the affairs of our community, we would 
become successful in the eyes of our fellow 
men. 

We are going into a new phase of our 
lives. We will become a Success or Failure. 
For many the road will be rough, but with 
ready hearts to meet it and climb over the 
jagged spots, many will come to the end 
and find the shining surface of the Future 
looming up before them. The Future may 
offer more climbs, some more easily made, 
and others will offer nothing but a jolt 
back down where they started from. 

We know that this Door is not easily 
opened, but we will put all our ambition, 
hopes, strength and efforts into the Push 
behind it that will open it to a final glory 
and peace. 

Cora Warner '46. 



FREE? 

Out of the chaos, the darkened deep of 
struggle, and the pain of human blood 
soaking sod to a fullness of horror never 
before imagined — out of this war democ- 
racy has emerged free; free at the present 
moment; free in the sense that it is not 
dominated by a Nazi dictator. The entire 
world is free from war. Some are, for the 
first time, free from want, free to speak 
what they think. Some are happy that they 
are free to go to sleep in the evening when 
amber waves of light sink into a peaceful 
maze evolving a "silent" night. Yes, we 
think, "Never again will the world know 
the horror of life as we have learned to 
know it" — but are we free from ourselves? 

Are we free from ourselves? Has man 
now become capable of controlling his lust, 
his madness? This is what man must de- 
cide before even a semblance of world peace 
can be born. It is not the temporary defeat 
of nation by nation, nor even the perma- 
nent defeat of nation by nation that can 
create an over-all, a pervading sense of 
peace. Let nations conquer nations! Let 



worlds subdue worlds; yet still the pre- 
dominant evil of a new world, a new peace, 
is man. All that pertains to man may oc- 
cur only by the act of man. And thus it is 
up to man as an individual, a person, to 
rule the every aspect of his progenys' fare 
on earth. 

Whether or not man acts concerning this, 
is the factor upon which the beginning of 
unending quiet rests. If in his mind he 
thinks only of self, as he now does, the 
most unique of all dreams can never be 
realized. Only through his consideration of 
each minute detail of life can he set up 
the first milestone on this path of pro- 
gression without which man will eventually 
terminate himself. 

Can man be free from himself? Will he 
be free from himself? Will a progress in 
the fate of mankind be begun? Scientific 
progress, material progress, cannot help. 
This must be a progress of the mind, of 
the soul of man. And so the problem re- 
mains. Will we be free from ourselves? 

Floyd Merritt ,47. 



22 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



RACE DISCRIMINATION 
After four years of war our country is 
settling down to the long-awaited peace. I 
think that now is the most appropriate 
time to settle the Negro-White question 
that has arisen ever since our country wa3 
established. During the war this important 
matter was rated as secondary as it might 
well have been, but now we must wake up 
and look at the facts. Unless we are pre- 
pared to treat the Negro as an equal, we 
might find ourselves involved in another 
war — a racial war. 

What are these facts ? Not long ago stu- 
dents in a high school in New York went 
on strike because Negroes were allowed to 
attend the same classes as they. These 
students literally refused to associate with 
the Negroes and asked that they be ex- 
pelled from school. In my opinion the stu- 
dents on strike should have been the ones 
to be expelled. However, the officials of the 
school demanded that the students resume 
their studies and things quieted down. This 



matter is not settled and may at the slight- 
est provocation rise up again. 

Anoher important factor is the question 
cf lace riots. Detroit is the best-known 
city for these disturbances, but lately there 
have bsen several in Tennessee which have 
warranted a house-to-house search for gjns 
and knives. Many times small insignificant 
facts start these riots and they end in 
bloodshed. 

Anti-Negroes state that if we loosen up 
the hold with which we lower the morals 
of the Negroes, they will rise up and rule 
us. This is a very selfish idea which could 
only originate in a weak mind. When a per- 
son is freed, he very seldom attacks his 
liberator. Even animals knaw what a good 
turn looks like, and very often return it. 

The Negroes must be given an equal 
chance for freedom. Everyone knows that 
old saying. "God created men equal." but 
how many live up to it ? 

Doris Graves '47. 



Informals 




Identification page 39 



24 



WILLlAMSBl'riG HIGH SCHOOL 



Literary 



THE EMPEROR'S PICTURE FRAME 

The ketch Torantula was sailing south- 
ward through the West Indies one niDon- 
light summer night. She was bound for 
San Salvador. Brazil, and not far astern lay 
the bright lights of San Juan from which 
she had sailed a few hours before. 

"the looks quite different from the last 
time. Right, Sam?" 

The statement and q-estian was directed 
by John Baxter, one of five men who had 
pooled their money and resources to buy 
the Torantula and outfit her. He spoke to a 
tall man standing at the wheel. 

Around him sat three other men, namely 
"Congo" Edwards, owner of the ship's 
launch. Hank Rider, owner of the ship's 
powerful short wave radio, and "Frenchi" 
Freeman. 

"Yes, but that was five years ago and 
the war and brownout were still on." 

Suddenly "Congo" looked up from the 
electric starter motor he was overhauling 
and asked the question that for three years 
he had been trying to get an answer to. 
"Just what happened on that trip? Every- 
body else aboard knows but me." 

John looked at the other men and seeing 
them all nod he lighted his pipe and began. 

It really started in the fall of '43 when 
the Navy decided that something should be 
done about the Japanese junks that were 
sailing on the China Sea and bringing rice 
and other much-needed foodstuffs to Japan. 
Though these junks and their cargo were 
not worth the trouble and cost either to 
torpedo or surface and shell them, still they 
were bringing food into Japan without 
which many people would starve. Then 
someone got the idea of designing a special 
sub that would be able to ram these junks. 
Then, while grappling hooks held the two 
boats together, a special boarding party 
would go on board and pick up anything 
that might be useful and could easily be 
brought aboard the sub. Also they would 
force those of the crew still alive to leave 
the ship in their lifeboats so that when the 
sub pulled off they would have no chance to 
close the seacocks and patch the hole left 
by the sub. They were also to take the 



junk's captain aboard the sub and hold him 
until they could meet a long-range i'.ying 
boat which would take him to the nearest 
American base. 

Ihe first junk attacked in this way was 
called the Mitsuy-Marce and was owned by 
her captain, a Jap by the ram? of Mitsuy 
as we learned from her log. Sam was a 
member of the boarding party and just 
before he left the captain's cabin on the 
junk he no'.iced a velvet bag lying in the 
ship's safe. He picked it up and discovered 
that all it contained was a picture frame. 
He was going to throw it away when he 
noticed what semed to be a small golden 
flower in the center of the vpper edge of 
the frame. Then it dawned on him that 
that little flower was the Imperial Chry- 
santhemum and its presence on the frame 
could only mean that this frame was meant 
to hold a picture of the Emperor. This was 
the reason that it was encased in velvet and 
kept in the ship's safe. Taking the frame 
he went aboard the sub and she backed off 
leaving the sea rushing into the big hole 
left by the sub. 

A year later when he was transferred to 
the Torantula, then owned by the Navy and 
used for special duty, he still had that 
frame. 

Since I had owned a ketch before I joined 
the Navy I was put in command of the 
Torantula. For a crew I had Sam, Hank 
and five other sailors. Now the Navy wanted 
to look over the coast of South America 
to see if there were any more good places 
where we might build bases and also where 
German subs might stop and refuel. It was 
this mission that sent us sailing along the 
coast of French Guiana after having fol- 
lowed almost the same course that we 
are following now from New York. 

One night about twelve a tropical hurri- 
cane was suddenly upon us, and before we 
could lower the mainsail an unusually 
strong, fast gust of wind snapped the main 
mast. We weathered the rest of the storm 
and then put in at the nearest port, Cay- 
enne, the capital of French Guiana. Here 
we tried to find a new mast but were in- 
formed by the owner of the only ship-out- 



THE TATTLER 



lio 



fitting store there that it would take at 
least two weeks to get a new mast and then 
another week to have it installed. I told the 
crew that after they had removed the old 
mast stump and repaired the rigging so 
that when the new mast arrived the ship 
would be all ready to receive it, they could 
go ashore for the rest of the two weeks 
providing they would let me know where 
they were. Two days after the crew went 
ashore I invited the owner of the store to 
come aboard the next night for dinner. He 
accepted my invitation and when he en- 
tered my cabin the first thing he saw was 
that picture frame hanging on the wall 
where it had been placed for a good-luck 
piece. He started to bow and then checked 
himself as he felt me looking at him. He 
ate in a great rush and then went back to 
his house because he said he expected word 
about the mast. About nine o'clock he came 
over again and said that they had run 
across a perfect mahogany mast about fifty 
miles up the coast, and since there were 
men there who could install it he suggested 
that he could lend me enough men to sail 
the Torantula up there, since she had two 
powerful Diesels as auxiliary power. I 
radioed my crew where I was going and told 
them to meet me there as soon as they 
could. Then about twelve o'clock three men 
came aboard and we started. These men 
were led by Frenchi and said that the other 
four men would join us about five miles 
up the coast. Frenchi said he could sail the 
boat all right and that I could get some 
sleep, and so I went below. About an hour 
later I was awakened by my cabin lights 
being turned on and saw Frenchi standing 
in the doorway with a sub-machine gun in 
his hands. His sleeves were rolled up and 
on his left arm was a tatoo mark showing 
that he had escaped from the French penal 
colony, Devil's Island. He informed me that 
the Torantula was now the property of the 
Imperial Japanese Navy and that the seven 
men above deck were pure Japanese from 
a race of white Japs on one of the north- 
ernmost of the Japanese islands. I was 
then tied to my bunk until we arrived at the 
harbor where the mast awaited us. Here 



the new mast was expertly installed under 
Frenchi's direction. When it had been in- 
stalled Frenchi took me over to the mast 
and pointed to a small mark burned on it 
near the deck. It was the same as the work 
on the picture frame. Frenchi explained 
that Mitisudi (the ship outfitter's real 
name) was the only living member of the 
Mitsuy family and he planned to take me 
and the rest of the crew up one of the 
small rivers and feed us to the fish. About 
this time the crew arrived and were 
promptly put under guard. The next day 
Mitisudi arrived and we were put on board 
the Torantula's launch. We started up the 
river on what we thought to be a one-way 
trip. When we were about four miles up 
the river he pulled up to the bank and shot 
a chimpanzee which he tossed into the river. 
In a matter of seconds hundreds of small 
fish were swimming around it and tearing 
the flesh off its bones. In a few minutes 
the bones were stripped clean and they 
drifted from sight. Then Mitisudi turned 
and pointed to one of my crew. Immediately 
two of his guards stepped behind him and 
backed up Mitisudi's invitation to go swim- 
ming. Suddenly Frenchi turned on the near- 
est of the Jap guards and started shooting. 
In quick succession the three guards went 
down. As Frenchi started shooting, Miti- 
sudi reached for his pistol but found that 
Frenchi had already "lifted" it. Frenchi 
turned on Mitisudi and forced him into the 
water. With a scream he went under to 
find out what happened to the chimpanzee. 
"But why," asked "Congo," "did Frenchi 
turn on Mitisudi and his gang and why was 
he allowed to become a member of the 
Torantula especially since he had escaped 
from Devil's Island?" 

"You see, 'Congo,' " replied John, "Frenchi 
was sent to Devils Island because he was 
framed on a murder charge by some politi- 
cal enemies in France and Mitisudi had 
forced him to work for him because he told 
him that if he didn't the Germans would 
kill his family. But a little while before we 
were captured Frenchi learned through 
some letter's of Mitisudi's that his whole 
home town had been destroyed by the Ger- 



20 



W I L L I A M S B U R G HIGH SCHOOL 



mans in the early part of the war. 

But to get back to the story. We headed 
the launch down stream and soon came 
into the harbor. Besides the five-inch rifle 
on the forward deck of the Torantula, the 
Navy had also mounted a heavy machine 
gun on the launch. When we reached the 
mouth of the river we raced for the Toran- 
tula while the machine gun answered the 
shore guns. When the Torantula was 
reached the deck gun was manned and 
while we sailed out of the harbor it sank 
what boats were in the harbor besides giv- 
ing the Jap buildings a going over. Later 
we radioed the French authorities and they 
captured the Japs that had not escaped. 
During the fight three of the navy men 
were killed and five of the men on board 
were injured. Joseph Myrtel '48. 

SOME PEOPLE ARE PESTS! 

Babs White was walking home from 
school with her girl friend, Penny. Right 
now Penny was slinging the latest dirt, 
such as, "Did you hear about Lou and 
Barton splitting up?" or "Sue is going with 
Joe now. He's the fifth one this week." 
Babs liked Penny. She was so understand- 
ing sometimes, but occasionally she pro- 
voked Babs, like today. Well, anyway, 
when the two had reached the White's 
pleasant-looking home, Babs left Penny to 
continue on her merry way. Babs bounded 
up the steps and slammed the door behind 
her. Mrs. White's voice echoed from the 
stairs, "For heaven's sage, Babs! Please 
close the door quietly." Sometimes mothers 
were definitely gruesome. 

But Babs couldn't be bothered making any 
reply. She had to get ready. She had a date 
with Ken Baxter (hubba, hubba), her 
O. A. O. They were going to see Cornel 
Wilde in "A Thousand and One Nights." 
Mom came down in a few minutes to get 
supper and Babs rushed for the bathroom 
only to find her kid brother, Raymond, 
sailing his boats in the bathtub. "Tumble, 
tumble weed," Babs explained. 

"Why?" inquired Raymond, "Have you 
got a date with that swoon goon again?" 

"Yes," returned Babs icily. So with much 



maneuvering she managed to get Raymond 
out of the bathroom and she got in. 

By the time supper was ready she had 
had her bath, done her nails and her 
clothes were lying on her bed ready to be 
slipped into. At the table Raymond re- 
marked that Ken was a trickle (drip). 

"Mother!" Babs retorted, "Is this drip 
necessary ? " 

"Raymond!" mother said, "please stop 
plaguing your sister." 

"Oh, all right. But I still think he's a 
drip." 

As soon as supper was finished she went 
up to her room. She was doing her hair 
when Raymond appeared in the doorway. 
"Hello, sucker. Busy?" 

"Raymond White, you get out of here," 
and Babs rushed for the door, but Ray- 
mond was already half way down the stairs. 

Babs was ready, all but putting on her 
coat when the doorbell rang. Raymond 
went and opened the door for Ken. Then 
he came to the bottom of the stairs and 
called, "Babs, that guy is here." Babs waa 
practically boiling over as she came slowly 
down the stairs. As she came into the room 
Ken rose and came toward her. "Hello, 
cupcake." Ken said. Taking her arm he 
led her to the front door. As they stepped 
out into the clear air all the afternoon's 
happenings drifted from her mind, and she 
thought only of the coming evening and 
Ken. Shirley Nichols '48. 

A WALK IN THE WOODS 

Through paths of laurel full in bloom 

We strolled along together. 
And soon we passed some ladies' slipper 

All as small as ever. 

Then up a hill and round a bend, 

Ferns were growing there; 
Soon we smelled the wild rose; 

We gathered some with care. 

And so we strolled along the paths 
Where trees and flowers blended; 

Birds sang in nearby tri . 
But now our walk is ended. 

By Doris Shumway '49. 



THE TATTLER 



27 



"UNCONQUERED SOUL" 
Who can quell a soul so composed 
of hottest fire and iron will? 
Who shall say to him 

"You are conquered?" 
Who can quench his heart's desire 
which flames so like to Hell's own fire? 
Who shall say to him 

"You are my slave?" 
For he is slave to no man 
who will fight for liberty. 
Who will stand with mighty blade 
across the path of tyranny? 
Who will defy his blazing eyes 
and fleet ambition? 
Who shall say to him 

"You are afraid?" 
Who will say these mocking words 
to him who dreads no earthly man, 
nor pain, nor death, nor flowing blood; 
who thrives of peril and clang of arms. 
He who fears but fear itself. 

By Bob Dana '46. 

NATURE 

The sun sinks slowly behind the hills, 

The birds sail over the neighboring rills; 
The forest grows shady in the afternoon 
sun, 
From the shade of the forest some rab- 
bits run. 

Night now is creeping over the hills, 
Gone are the birds from the neighboring 
rills; 
From the near-by meadows the whip-poor- 
will calls, 
The sound on the landscape softly falls. 

A gentle breeze sweeps over the lea, 
Stopping to rustle the leaves of a tree, 

Rocking some baby birds in their nest, 
Then passing onward toward the west. 

When we see these things so beautifully 
done: 
The forest, the breeze, the setting sun, 

We know as we turn away to rest, 
Nature's work has been done the best. 

Marilyn Williams '48. 



HOLD ON, NO SORROW 
Wait 'till the day that they come home, 
That was the cry from sod to foam, 
Not today, not tomorrow, 
But some day soon, 
Hold on, no sorrow. 

Ah, yes, the day has come! 

The joy leaves one cold and numb, 

But can you see? 

My darling boy, 

Where can he be? 

With heads held high, 
Ihey all pass by, 
And yet no sight; 
Won't I see 
My love tonight? 

Wait 'till the day that they come home, 
That was the cry from sod to foam, 
Not today, not tomorrow, 
But some day soon, 
Hold on, no sorrow. 

By Ruth Bowker '46. 

MEMORIES 

It was raining when we landed in Oran, 
Africa. The weather was disagreeable and 
we were the same. Coming over, the ocean 
had been very rough. A few had not sur- 
vived. 

After a few weeks we became adjusted 
somewhat to the people and climate. 

Most of the people I saw were Arabs, a 
bold, dirty class. They would often come 
to the edge of the camp and stand, or sit, 
all day, just watching whatever of interest 
was going on. They would steal if a chance 
presented itself. One day a soldier gave 
an Arab an old pair of shorts. The Arab, 
having never seen anthing like that before, 
tore them in half and then tied them 
around his waist like a sash. 

In this section there was no such thing 
as sanitation. The houses were of one 
story, stone construction, with one door, 
used by the livestock as well as the family. 
On one side of the house the stock, such as 
a pig, horse and maybe a couple of cows 
with chickens would be kept. The family 



28 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



would live on the other side. One day one of 
the boys in the outfit bought a chicken 
from an Arab. He kept it tied with a shoe- 
string to a tent peg, hoping to fatten it up 
with a diet of hard tack and thus have a 
good chicken dinner. The intelligent chicken 
laid an egg one day and so prolonged its 
life as fresh eggs were scarce. I never 
found out what fina'.ly happened to it. 

One of the best features of the country 
consisted of the beautiful moonlit nights 
when the sky was illuminated as if it were 
day. 

After seven months in Africa we moved 
to Italy. It took us three days to get to 
Italy in an L. C. I. boat. When we landed 
some of us were ordered to do one thing 
and in a few minutes another fellow would 
order us to do just the opposite. There was 
complete confusion. After a time an agree- 
ment was reached. We then marched five 
mi!es to the place where we pitched our 
tents. We were located in an orchard where 
peach and apple trees were growing and 
nearby there was a large dairy farm. Later 
we found out that the farm had belonged 
to Mussolini's son-in-law, Count Ciano. The 
place was a huge modern dairy farm in 
the forgotten land. Outside of orchards, 
trees were very scarce, being planted only 
along highways and in small forest areas. 
Very little lumber is used for buildings, 
most houses being constructed of stone and 
cement. The people are expert at this sort 
of work. Most houses were very modern in 
design. The only bad feature of Italy was 
the mosquitoes, and they were so big and 
thick they would walk off with your mess 
kit, supper and all, before you could eat it. 

Wild flowers were abundant and of every 
color. There were large fields of clover 
different from what we know in America. 
The blossom is a long spike of crimson red 
instead of round rose-colored blooms of 
the variety we know. I once saw a peasant 
mowing in a clover field with a queer-looking 
scythe. It was a crude implement, the blade 
six inches wide at the heel and the handle 
consisting of two long sticks wired to- 
gether. The family cow was used for plow- 
ing or any other work for which we ordi- 
narily use a horse. Their horses were used 
mainly as saddle horses. 

While in Italy I met a friend from 



Florence, Massachusetts, who 1 had not 
seen since leaving the United States. We 
were together for eight months. When we 
had an opportunity we went for long walks 
in the country. We often bought fresh 
vegetables for which we paid very high 
prices. They charge thirty-five lire (about 
35c) for a tomato and twenty lire for a 
cucumber. Once we paid one dollar for six 
eggs. Ice cream also was a rare treat. One 
time our cadre got thirty gallons. About 
forty men put finishing touches on it and 
had chills and stomach aches all night. 
Another time a friend and I went to a 
Red Cross center where ice cream was 
being served. After going through the lines 
five times we became ashamed and de- 
cided to quit. 

There was an old Italian theatre in a 
nearby town, and sometimes Ralph and I 
would go there and see some of the latest 
movies. 

While in Italy I sent home many souve- 
nirs. I went to a castle in Caserta and from 
there I sent a coral brooch and earrings. 
From Naples I sent a cameo and from 
Pompeii a beautiful blue bedspread. 

A group of us went to Mt. Vesuvius when 
it was at its peak of eruption. We also 
viewed the Isle of Capri. 

One day I went with a group of fellows 
who visited Rome, on a pass. We hired a 
guide and saw some of the main sights 
around the city, and through Vatican City. 
Words cannot possibly describe the beauty 
of Vatican City; such paintings and sculp- 
tm - e as I never had dreamed could exist. 
It left me spellbound. To think that people 
have paid thousands of dollars to see this 
place, and all it cost me was fifty lire for 
my share of the guide's pay. From there I 
sent home a book of paintings and sculp- 
ture. I went through St. Peter's Cathedral 
just half an hour too soon to see the Pope. 
This trip was one of the most wonderful 
experiences in my life. It also included a 
tour through the Catacombs, a rather weird 
place to say the least. 

Rome was quite a beautiful city. The 
women were very good-looking. The people 
were extremely well-dressed and I saw 
Fords, Packards, Chevys and many other 
American-made cars. To look at the city in 
general you would never have guessed there 



THE TATTLER 



29 



was a war. You could buy almost anything 
if you had enough money. 

We next moved up to France which was 
more like home. France has rolling country- 
sides and high mountain ranges like the 
White Mountains. The trees and vegetation 
were much like home. There were beautiful 
flower gardens. The first camp we made in 
this country was on the banks of a river. 
Some Indian fellows went into the stream 
and caught some beautiful rainbow trout 
with their bare hands. Two or three of the 
fish were fourteen inches long and that is 
no fish story. 

The people of France were nothing like 
those of North Africa. They were much 
neater and more friendly. 

Germany was extremely beautiful in 



parts. Our headquarters were at a big air 
base, at the time of the surrender of the 
forces, May 8th. 

The most beautiful place of all, I thought, 
.vas Belgium. It was really indescribable. 
The people were nice and I came to know 
one family very well. Two sisters had been 
prisoners of the Germans, but in spite of 
everything they still had faith in the fu- 
ture. 

Leaving France for home I thought of 
the wealth and knowledge I had gained 
from passing even a short time in these 
countries. I knew the world was far from 
boring to one who could see it in all its 
variations. 

Viola Fraser '47. 



THE REWARD 

The glorious sun shone on the dust-packed 
road, 

The air with pure fragrance was filled; 

The light, bustling meadows swayed back- 
ward and fro 

As birds their sweet melodies trilled. 

And down this long road trudged a weary 

old soul, 
His back bent with the troubles on earth 
His gray bearded face enclosed in the light 
Of simplicity, wisdom, and worth. 

He had passed down this way since the 

birth of time, 
He had watched as the ages grew. 
With a smile on his face and warmth in 

his heart 
He had shown the way for you. 



He had lived with the man who had fought 

for the right, 
Who had won through love, not hate; 
Who had stretched out his hand to all 

mankind 
And received every one as a mate. 

He'd encouraged those who were pensive 

and sad; 
He'd mingled with those who were gay; 
He'd enriched those who were poor in heart 
And had taken their worries away. 

The road was now higher and the steps far 

steeper, 
The songs of the birds grew faint; 
Before him stood the great marble gates 
Which were guarded by Peter, the Saint. 

The gates were now open and from them 

came forth, 
Voices singing devotion and laud. 
He turned with a smile on the work he 

had done 
And the little old man saw God. 



By Shirley Hathaway '46. 



30 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Tattler Staff 




First Row: Sue Crone, Russell Loomis, Cora Warner, Floyd Merritt. Ruth Bowker. 
Second Row: Viola Fraser, Doris Graves, Helen Sylvester, Robert Dana. 



In the latter part of the first semester 
the editors of the Tattler were elected and 
given various duties, which would corre- 
spond with their various jobs. Under the 
supervision of Mrs. Thornton we have gath- 
ered all the important events of the past 
year and put them into this book. 

We have all worked hard to make this 
year's edition a success and because we all 
had a real purpose for doing these things 
all of us have enjoyed our work. 

THE STAFF. 



THE TATTLER 



31 



Review Staff 




First Row: Eleanor Barron, Barbara Dymerski, Robert Smart, Russell Loomis, Floyd 
Merritt, Robert Dana, Theodora Harlow, Betty Brooks. 

Second Row: Dorothy Carver, Shirley Payne, Palma Ingellis, Mae Sanderson, Geor- 
gene Harry, Hattie Clark. 

Third Row: Allen Sylvester, Shirley Hathaway, Faculty Advisor Mrs. Brown, Eliza- 
beth Kulash, Alice Golash. 

Fourth Row: Robert Smith, Russell Warner, Richard Daniels, Frank Collins, Dor- 
rance Bates. 



-Editor-in-Chief— Floyd Merritt. 

Business Manager — Richard Daniels. 

Artist — Robert Smart. 

Sports Editor — Robert Dana. 

Feature Editor — Theodora Harlow. 

Campus Capers — Robert Dana. 

Exchange Editor — Laura Lloyd. 

Alumni Editor — Elizabeth Brooks. 

Circulation Manager — Russell Loomis. 

Faculty Adviser — Mrs. Brown. 

Starting out with an interested and hard- 
working staff and Mrs. Brown, as faculty 
adviser, We have been able to publish eight 
editions of the Review this year. We have 
changed much of the working order and 

*Prize for the person who contributed 
most to the success of the Review. 



introduced a number of new features from 
time to time. 

The students' literary material and all 
the school news have dominated the major 
portion of the paper; among the features 
have been Campus Capers, Movie Reviews, 
Interviews, Fashions, Sports, Alumni and 
Pictures which we developed ourselves. 
There have also been thorough discussions 
of many questions the students seemed to 
know little about. Our exchange and cir- 
culation departments have been especially 
active. 

Through the feeling of satisfaction 
through work well done we who have en- 
joyed our work this year hope that next 
year's Review Staff may continue where 
we leave off and have the enjoyment from 
it that we had. 



32 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Forensic League 




First Row: Marilyn Williams, Ruth Bowker, Miss Webber, Robert Dana, Floyd Merritt. 
Second Row: Viola Fraser, Barbara Outhuse, Doris Graves, Shirley Nichols, Ruth 
Wells and Warren McAvoy. 



In the past year the members of the 
Forensic League have been most successful. 
Under the excellent guidance of Miss Web- 
ber they won the Connecticut Valley 
League debating championship. The plaque 



Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 



Affirmative 

3 Hamp 

Westneld 3 

3 South Hadley 

3 Hopkins 

3 Amherst 



was presented to Miss Webber at the Junior 
Model Congress in Northampton by Donald 
Marshall, president of the Connecticut 
Valley League. The results of the year's 
debates were: 



Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamsburg 



Negative 

Hamp 3 
2 Westneld 1 

1 South Hadley 

2 Hopkins 1 
2 Amherst 1 



The Forensic League debaters consisted 
of the affirmative team, Ruth Bowker and 
Robert Dana, and the negative team, Mari- 
lyn Williams and Floyd Merritt, who at- 
tended the state contest at Shrewsbury. 
Several members also gave declamations at 
the state contest. 



The members of the Forensic League 
represented their high school at the North- 
ampton Junior Model Congress, another 
Congress at A. I. C. and at a Panel Dis- 
cussion on recreation held at Massachusetts 
State. Miss Webber has done a superb job 
in coaching her debaters into a champion- 
ship team. 



THE TATTLER 



33 



Pro Merito 




First Row: Sue Crone, Helen Sylvester, Shirley Hathaway. 

Second Row: Dorothy Carver, Barbara Dymerski, Floyd Merritt, Georgene Harry 
and Doris Graves. 



Cur Williamsburg High School Pro 
Merito Society consists this year of eight 
members, five juniors and three seniors, 
whose names appear above. Those who are 
seniors will give orations at graduation. 

In May, six of us attended the State Pro 
Merito Convention held at Northampton. 
Hei^e we were divided into sections which 
elected officers for next year's convention. 
Marilyn Williams, a sophomore, was elected 
State Junior Pro Merito Secretary. In the 
afternoon we heard various speakers and 
were audience to an illustrated movie on 
western scenery. 

It is an interesting fact that twenty-five 
per cent of the two classes are Pro Merito 
students, a relatively high percentage. 



34 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Basketball 




First Row: Robert Smart, Allen Sylvester, Marshall Warner, Edward McColgan. 

Raymond Morin. 
Second Row: Manager Roger LaCourse, Robert Smith. Coach Edward Foster, R.ssell 

Warner, Scorekeeper Ronald Beattie. 



During the years '43, '44 and '45, the 
war brought bad news for the "Burgy 
High sports program, for it was almost 
impossible to get a coach for basketball. 

In '43 and '44 we played as an inde- 
pendent team and did very well. The next 
year we were unable to play as an inde- 
pendent team due to gasoline rationing. We 
also had lost a large number of our team. 
When '45 and '46 came along, we managed 
to start anew with Leo Dymerski as coach. 
There were only three fellows who had had 
three years of experience behind them. 
These were Lezynsky. Healy and M. War- 
ner. This year the Basketball League con- 
sisted of the following schools: Sanderson 
Academy, Huntington, Charlemont and 
'Burgy. 

We started the year off by playing 
Chester and we lost, 11 to 39. This did not 
lower the spirits of the team at all. The 



cheer leaders, who were T. Harlow. B. Ku- 
lash, J. Hillenbrand and R. Nye, and the 
students helped keep the spirits of the team 
high. 

When January 10 came around we lost 
Leo Dymerski as our coach, and Mr. Foster, 
who has coached the school teams several 
other times in years past, took over the 
job of finishing the basketball season for 
the year as coach. We also lost two play- 
ers, Healy and Lezynski. who joined the 
Navy. 

This year the team is losing two mem- 
bers, Bob Dana, who has played for two 
years, and Marshal! Warner, who has 
played for four years. The remaining mem- 
bers of the team have now had a year or 
more of experience, and the members of 
the 'Burgy High School are sure that these 
fellows will make a great team in the years 
to come. Continued on next page 



THE TATTLER 



35 



Cheer Leaders 




Theodora Harlow, Elizabeth Kulash, Janet Hillenbrand, Rowena Nye. 

The team went through the season by 
winning only two games out of twelve. This 
is not surprising, for although the boys 
were trying their best, they were green, 
and it takes a great deal of time to work 
out plays and get whipped into condition. 



Williamsburg 


11 


Chester 


39 


Williamsburg 


9 


Deerfield 


49 


Williamsburg 


18 


South Hadley 


66 


Williamsburg 


20 


Chester 


19 


Williamsburg 


10 


Charlemont 


18 


Williamsburg 


13 


Clark School 


44 


Williamsburg 


9 


Huntington 


31 


Williamsburg 


2 


Sanderson 


44 


Williamsburg 


24 


Powers 


15 


Williamsburg 


11 


Huntington 


39 


Williamsburg 


14 


Sanderson 


24 


Williamsburg 


13 


Powers 


27 



36 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Orchestra 




First Row: Raymond Morin, Miss Healy. 
Second Row: John Maggs, Floyd Merritt. 
Third Row: Richard Daniels, Warren McAvoy, Roy Baldwin. 



Continuing in its third consecutive year 
the orchestra, under the direction of Miss 
Healy, our music supervisor, has been a 
source of enjoyment both to its audiences 
and to the players. Since many of our most 
talented musicians were lost through gradu- 
ation last spring we found a rather small 
group left in September. Several boys from 
the high school and the eighth grade have 
joined the group during the year, how- 
ever, and although a few left, our number 
has remained satisfactory. 

Practises have been held for a 40-minute 
period twice a week throughout the year. 
The orchestra has also played at several 



(own affairs, including Women's Club, 
Grammar School, Christmas operetta, 
rchool assemblies, and graduation. At this 
time we would like to thank the faculty and 
Superintendent Merritt for their interest in 
our organization throughout the year. 

Those of us who have played in the or- 
chestra have enjoyed it thoroughly and sin- 
cerely hope that it will continue in the 
years that lie ahead. Our one desire is that 
anyone, boy or girl, who plays an instru- 
ment of any kind will join this organization 
and so, through larger numbers and better 
practises, improve on the work which we 
who pioneer have accomplished. 



THE TATTLER 



37 



Alumni Notes 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President— D. Clary Snow, '29. 

Vice-President — Shirley Meisse, '40. 

Treasurer — Eleanor Ballway, '35. 

Secretary — Jean Hemenway, '40. 

Executive Committee — Evelyn Kmit, Roy 
Leonard, Helen Watling. 

CLASS OF '45 

Elizabeth Mary Batura — Pro-phy-lac-tic 
Brush Co., Florence, Mass. 

Ruth Eunice Bean — Cooley-Dickinson 
Hospital, Northampton, Mass. 

Mary Louise Bisbee — Oberlin College, 
Oberlin, Ohio. 

Neil Fairfield Damon — U. S. Navy, sta- 
tioned at Boston. 

Lorraine Elizabeth Jones — Post-Graduate, 
W. H. S., Williamsburg, Mass. 

Ruth Alice LaCasse — Grant Company, 
Leeds, Mass. 

Rita Jeanette Lupien — Becker Junior 
College, Worcester, Mass. 

Ruth Eleanor Mollison — Commercial Col- 
lege, Northampton, Mass. 

Louise Beatrice Newell — Cooley-Dickin- 
son Hospital, Northampton, Mass. 

Barry Jay Purrington — Williston Acad- 
emy, Easthampton, Mass. 

Phyllis Rita Rhoades — Grant Company, 
Leeds, Mass. 

Eva Jane Sanderson — Becker Junior Col- 
lege, Worcester, Mass. 

Antionette Lucille Stevens — Resides at 
West Concord, Mass. 

Clifford Malcolm Thayer — Coast Guard, 
stationed at Baltimore, Md. 

ALUMNI DEATHS 

Edward Dolan, '18; Alfred Dimes, '13. 
ALUMNI BIRTHS 

Fred Allen, '41 — Daughter. 

Rita LaCourse Corbett, '40 — Daughter. 

Doris Dymerski Szarkowski, '42 — Son. 

George Judd, '33 — Daughter. 

Donald Otis, '39— Daughter. 

Antoinette Lucille Stevens, '45 — Daugh- 
ter. 

Florence Packard Eldred, '40 — Son. 

Edith Packard Stowe, '39— Son. 

Lucius Merritt, Jr., '41 — Daughter. 

Peter Snow, '31 — Daughter. 

Charles M. Damon, Jr., '32— Son. 



ALUMNI MARRIAGES 

Marion Warner, '44, to Frank Montague, 
Westhampton. 

Arlene Sabo, '43, to Richard Harry, Go- 
shen. 

Neil Damon, '45, to Donna Hobbs, '44, 
Williamsburg. 

Clifford Thayer, '45, to Inez Chapman, 
Northampton. 

Lottie Algustoski, '37, to Carl Sylvester, 
Wiliamsburg. 

Florence Packard, '40, to Steven Eldred, 
Weston, Mass. 

Clarice Graves, '44, to Leo Dymerski, '41, 
Williamsburg. 

Ruth Munson, '44, to Robert McKinney, 
Springfield. 

Ruth Carver, '44, to Edward Maxwell, 
San Diego, Cal. 

Bette Lou Harlow, '43, to Eugene Syl- 
vester, Williamsburg. 

Roberta Clark, '44, to Leroy Maxfield, 
Burlington, Wis. 

Audrey Jones, '42, to Mason Marvel, 
Montgomery, Ala. 

Donald Campbell, '42, to Dorothy Pringle, 
Williamsburg. 

Helen Batura, '39, to John Yeskie, North- 
ampton. 

Barbara Bisbee, '29, to Raymond Swanda, 
Chicopee. 

Lillian Blanchard, '37, to Edward Breen, 
Holyoke. 

Anne Lloyd, '40, to James O'Brien, Nut- 
ley, New Jersey. 

Constance Granger, '41, to Gurdon Ar- 
nold. 

Marcia Ingellis, '40, to Antonni Calabrate, 
Springfield. 

Phyllis West, '39, to Edwin Webb, To- 
wanda, Pa. 

Marion Culver, '43, to William C. Atkins, 
Amherst. 

ALUMNI GRADUATES 

Eloise Bartlett — Bates College. 
Geneva Graves — Colby Jr. College. 
Marion Sylvester — Commercial College. 
Martha Deane — Commercial College. 
Clarice Graves — Commercial College. 
Phyllis Granger — Commercial College. 



38 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Autographs 



THE TATTLER 



39 



Jokes 



A distinguished gentleman came to Aber- 
crombie and Fitch's in New York and asked 
to see shotguns. The clerk, sizing him up 
as a man of means, showed him a fine 
English model priced at $450. 

"A splendid gun," the man said, "but a 
little expensive." 

The clerk brought out a Belgian model 
priced at $275. 

"Still a little expensive," observed the 
gentleman. 

A bit discouraged, the clerk said: "Well, 
here is a Winchester mass-production model 
at $17.50." 

The gentleman brightened. "That will do 
nicely. After all, it's only a small wedding." 



Bobby-soxer on the telephone: "I'd love 
to go, but I feel I should help my father 
with my homework." 



A Detroit school teacher was given a 
ticket for driving through a stop light. On 
the following Monday, she was to appear 
in court. She went at once to the judge and 
explained that she had to teach next Mon- 
day and asked for immediate disposal of her 
case. 

"So you're a school teacher," said the 
judge. "Madam, your presence here fulfills 
a long-standing ambition of mine. You sit 
right down at that table and write, 'I went 
through a stop sign' 500 times." 



Informals Identification 

1 Sue Crone 

2 Hattie Clark 

3 Bettie Kulash 

4 Shirley Hathaway 

5 Helen Sylvester 

6 Bob Dana 

7 Russell Loomis 

8 Helen Sylvester 

9 Ruth Bowker 

10 Marshall Warner 

10 Cora Warner 

11 Cora Warner 



WILLIAMSBURG 
FUEL & ICE CO. 

Coal — Mobilheat — Ice 
Williamsburg 



KING'S PAINT & PAPER STORE 

Modene Paints 
Thibaut Wallpapers 

157 Main St. Northampton 



BEEBE'S LUNCH 



A Good Place to Eat 



Ice Cream and Beverages 



Berkshire Trail A. T. Beebe, Prop. 



Haydenville 



A. SOLTY'S 



Meats — Groceries 



Vegetables 



Telephone 223 Haydenville 



WARD MILLER 



Westinghouse & Norge Refrig. 



Oil Burners & Service 



Home Insulation 



14 Center St. 



Phone 2123-R 



Northampton, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



A Friend 





War Bonds 


Compliments of 


and 




Stamps 


A FRIEND 


WILLIAMSBURG 




POST OFFICE 


Compliments of 


PACKARD'S SODA SHOPPE 


School Supplies, Magazines, Greeting Cards 


Patent Medicines 


Opposite Town Hall 


Our Oown Ice Cream Fountain and Booth Service 


C. F. JENKINS 


Stationery — Greeting Cards — Medicines 


Ice Cream 


Williamsburg Massachusetts 


Williamsburg Garage 


Herbs and Annuals 


C. K. Hathaway 


Choice Perennials 




for 


Tel. 4351 


Rock Garden and Border 


Service Station 


House Plants 


Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 


Village Hill Nursery 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 



Compliments of 




The Clary Farm 


Compliments of 


Try 




Our Maple Syrup 


C. 0. Carlson 


For Farm and Village Property 


Goshen, Mass. 


Consult Silas Snow 




Telephone 3563 Williamsburg 




Brooks Garage 


All Kinds of Rough and 


Finished Lumber 


Colonial Esso Garage 


Pure Maple Syrup 

Fancy Cake Sugar 


Gas — Oil — Accessories 


And Soft Sugar 


Electric Welding 


Packard Bros. 


Route 9 Berkshire Trail 


Goshen 




Telephone 4633 Williamsburg R.F.D. 


Goshen, Mass. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


A Friend 


The Class of '41 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


A Friend 


A Friend 



Compliments of 

GRANT PAPER PRODUCTS, INC. 

Leeds, Mass. 


Compliments of 

Snyder's Express 


Compliments of 

H. D. Stanton 
General Merchandise 

West Chesterfield, Mass. 

Telephone 2523 


R. F. Taylor 

Milk Trucking 

rnd 
General Express 

Tel. Williamsburg 4981 Goshen 


Wm. Baker & Son 

General Merchandise 

Service — Courtesy — Satisfaction 

Telephone 2341 Chesterfield 



Compliments of 


FRED G. DEWEY 


Dealer in 


Hard and Soft Wood and Slabs 


Tel. 4517 Mt. St. Haydenville 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


W. E. KELLOGG AND SON 


Dairy and Poultry Products 


Tel. 3631 Williamsburg 


J. W. BIRD CO. 


HARRY J. FIELD 


H. S. GOODWIN, Prop. 


Plumbing & Machine Shop 


Bird's Ice Cream Confectionery 


Lawnmower Service 


Newsdealer, Cigars 


Bridge Street 


Florence, Mass. 


Haydenville Mass. 


Compliments of 


• 


REARDON BROS. 


Compliments of 


Successors to 


DRAPER GARAGE 


William J. Sheehan 


NORTHAMPTON 


Haydenville 





BALTZER TREE SERVICE 


Complete Tree Service and Landscaping 


215 King St. Tel. 44-W— 44-R Northampton 


Compliments of 




Thacher's Express 


Compliments of 


Daily Trips 


The Class of '49 


Plainfield to Northampton 




Compliments of 






Compliments of 


Bryant's Radio & Electrical Shop 






Barker's Flowers 


Sales and Service 




A. J. Polmatier 




Plumbing and Heating 


Compliments of 


Second Hand Furniture and Stoves 


Mac Smith 


Tel. 3271 Williamsburg 





FLORENCE AUTO CLINIC 

15a N. Maple St., Florence, Mass. 

Expert Automobile Repairing 

Body and Fender Work 

Welding and Brazing 

For the Repair Bill with the Pleasant Surprise — See Us 

E. E. Jilkons Tel. 3380-M 



F. A. Bouley 



Compliments of 






Compliments of 


F. D. KEYES & SON 




Florists 


EVERYBODY'S MARKET 




Florence Mass. 


Florence Tel. 995-W 




Compliments of 


Compliments of 


DUR AY'S 


FICKERT AND FTNCK 


Beauty Salon Tel. 327-W 


Insurance 


and 


and 


Elecerical Appliance Co. Tel. 327-R 


Real Estate 


63 Main St. Florence 


63 Main St. Florence 






Gagnon's Sporting Goods Store 


Everything you wear, 
We clean with care — 


139 Main St. Florence, Mass. 


HANNIGAN-LEMAR CO. 


Complete line of hunting and 


Tels. 272, 700-M, 1107 


fishing equipment 


Stores in Easthampton, Northampton, 


Also general line of sports 


South Hadley 
Plant in Florence 



TREMBLAY DRUG CO. 

THE REXALL STORE 


FRANCIS L. LaMONTAGNE 


M. L. Sender, Ph.G., Reg. M., Prop. 


PAINTER & DECORATOR 


SAME SERVICE AS ALWAYS 




Pay Gas, Electric and 


Telephone 467-W 12 No. Maple St. 


Telephone Bills Here 




Telephone 2300 131 Main Street 


FLORENCE 


FLORENCE 




Products of Vermont 


GOOD THINGS TO EAT 




AT 


The VERMONT STORE 


BECKMANN'S 


239 Main Street 


NORTHAMPTON 




Candy Mailed Tasty Pastries 


Northampton 


Refreshing Sodas Fine Ice Cream 




When IN NEED of 




CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, SHOES 


Compliments of 


For Men and Boys 




Try 


JONES The Florist 


LONGTIN'S FLORENCE SHOP 




90 Maple St. Florence 


Telephone 4331-4332 Haydenville 


Telephone 828-W 




Service — Quality — Satisfaction 




Compliments of 


GAGNON & FORSANDER 






J. R. MANSFIELD & SON 


FLORENCE 






FUNERAL HOME 


Depot Avenue Telephone 819 


South Main Street 


ATLANTIC GASOLINE & OILS 


Haydenville Mass. 



BABY CHICKS 

DEERFIELD VALLEY POULTRY FARM 

FRANK and ALBERT CRONE 


SOCONY SERVICE 
STATION 

Dial 275 
Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

F. N. Graves & Son 
Williamsburg 


Compliments of 
The Class of '47 


Compliments of 

The Class of '48 


Compliments of 
A Friend 


Compliments of 

A Friend 



QUEEN'S 

KIDDIE CENTER 

10 Center St. Northampton 

Northampton's Only Complete 
Little Folks Furniture tSore 

CRIBS— CARRIAGE— YOUTH BEDS 
MATTRESSES and TOYS 


HANDICRAFT SHOP 

Graduation and Wedding Gifts 
Jewelry- 
Handkerchiefs 
Baby Things 

Handmade Articles 

179 Main Northampton 
Phone 3690 


HARLOW'S 

Luggage Repairs 

Bill Folds Toilet Kits 

EXPERT LOCKSMITH 

18 Center Street Telephone 155-W 
Northampton 


BREGUET'S SERVICE STATION 

MOBILGAS MOBILOIL 
MOBILUBRICATION 

Florence, Mass. 


j. f. McAllister 

ESSO SERVICENTER 

Gasoline Motor Oil 

Tires, Batteries and Accessories 

ROUTE 9 HAYDENVILLE 


Compliments of 

MacDONALD'S SHOE SHOP 

185 Main Street 
Northampton Mass. 


Compliments of 
The HAYDENVILLE COMPANY 

i 



CARROLL'S COSMETICS 


WOOD AND STRAND 


233 Main St. 


JEWELERS 


Northampton, Mass. 


Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 




BON MARCHE 




MILLINERY 


Compliments of 


Bags — Scarfs — Jewelry 


The Class of '49 


183 Main St. 




Northampton, Mass. 




Compliments of 


ERIC STAHLBERG, M. P. 


CAMERA PORTRAITS 


Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 



NORTHAMPTON STREET RAILWAY COMPANY 



MOTOR COACH SERVICE 



EDWARD A. PELLISSIER, 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


The Calvin Ice Cream Co. 


Victory Pontiac Motor Co. 


Northampton, Mass. 


Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


Beaver Brook Poultry Farm 






The Tower Farm 


Leeds, Mass. 




Holland's Service Station 


Home Remodeling 


Opp. Veterans' Hospital 


Kitchen Cabinets a Specialty 


Leeds, Mass. Tel. 3391 


Free Estimates 


Geo. Rolland, Prop. 


RENE RATHAY 


Service With a Smile 


81 Main St. Haydenville 




Compliments of 


Compliments of 


W. T. Sheckler 




149 Main Street 


Whalen's Service Station 


Northampton Mass. 




Chrysler and Plymouth Autos 







Compliments of 








HICKEY'S SODA SHOPPE 




Bridge St. 




Serving 

LaSALLE'S ICE CREAM 

Try Our Toasted Sandwiches 


Haydenville 


Compliments 


of 








CECIL C. LOOMIS AND SONS 








Cement, Sand & Gravel 








Cinder and Asphalt Driveways 




Tel. 4558 






Haydenville 


Compliments 


of 


W. H. PATTERSON 








Plumbing and Heating 
Master Kraft Oil Burners 




Tel. 33 




Easthampton, Mass. 



BISBEE BROTHERS 

Get Our Prices on Anything You Need 
TEL. WILLIAMSBURG 271 and CHESTERFIELD 2145 



YOU MAY ALWAYS DEPEND UPON THE QUALITY 
OF FLOWERS WHICH COME FROM 




FLOWERS 



GO TO BRANDLE'S FIRST 

To Save Time and Trouble for Your 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

MAIN STREET NORTHAMPTON 



CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. LEROY CHILSON 

AWNINGS — VENETIAN BLINDS 
FURNITURE COVERINGS & UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 

Furniture Upholstering Automobile Plate and Safety Glass 

Harness Shop Auto Tops and Upholstery 

Slip Covers, Cushions Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 

34 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 



■DU.lC.nL Authorized Sales & Service 

John C. Strubbe 



Complete Motor Analysis 
and Tune Up 

LATEST MODEL USED CARS 

Body & Fender Work 

Authorized 
Duco & Dulux Refinishing 



Telephone 
456 

139 King St. 



Northampton Buick Co. 



MANHAN POTATO CHIP CO. 

INC. 

Norma Lee Candies 



92 King St. 



Tel. 771 



Northampton 



WRECKED - CARS - MADE - NEW 
Carpenter's Body Shop 

General Fender and Body Repairs 
Spray Painting 



Phone 3337-W 



51 King St. 



NEWELL FUNERAL HOME 



R. D. NEWELL & SON 



74 King St. 



Northampton 





Hillcrest Farm 


Compliments of 


Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 


R. F. Burke 


Single Comb 




Rhode Island Reds 


Williamsburg 


Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 




Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 



Landscaping and Tree Service 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 



Telephone 211 



Old Goshen Road 



Compliments of 



THE HAYDENVILLE SAVINGS BANK 



Haydenville, Mass.